Snowboarding

Snowboarder Dies On Cliff Near Mammoth

by The Editors on March 21, 2019

Justin Khoshnevis, a 31-year-old snowboarder from Los Alamitos, California died Tuesday, March 19, 2019 after going out-of-bounds at Mammoth Mountain, according to a story on KTLA.com.

Around 3:50 p.m. Tuesday, a 911 caller reported seeing someone fall from the cliffs above Twin Lakes, which is across from Tamarack Lodge and north of the popular backcountry chute “Hole in the Wall,” according to a statement from the Mono County Sheriff’s Office.

Some have mentioned that he had come down Dragon’s Back and may have been trying to ride Hole In The Wall, but was not in the correct zone. “Officials urged skiers and snowboarders to never ride alone through backcountry areas and to have the proper equipment. They should also have a plan and know the route.”

[Link: KTLA.com]

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AMI Kills Off TransWorld SNOWboarding

by The Editors on March 8, 2019

Just as the snowboard industry was getting used to the idea of a future without TransWorld Snowboarding in print, the brand announces that as of March 6, 2019 the entire brand is dead and over. In a post on the site someone explained it like this:

All good things, unfortunately, must come to an end, and effective March 6, 2019, TransWorld SNOWboarding has closed; the 32nd volume of magazines will be our last, and Kamikazu will be our final film. Over the coming weeks on our site and social channels we’ll publish tributes and reflections from the photographers, editors, filmers, and riders who defined the title over the years, so please check back regularly.

According to a Keith Kelly story in the NY Post, what is left of TWSnow will be “rolled into in-house rival Snowboarder” and go digital. So what’s left?

Only three titles — Bike, Surfer, and Powder — will survive with regularly scheduled print editions after 14 titles of The Enthusiast Network were quietly sold to American Media Inc. . . “We always viewed the Adventure Sports Network as an acquisition focused on significant digital scale and unparalleled experiential events,” said an AMI spokesman.

It’s good to see that at least an unnamed AMI spokesman has a plan for the recently purchased titles.  We can’t wait to see how this all pans out.

[Link: TransWorld SNOWboarding and NY Post]

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How To Do Something You Should Never Do

by The Editors on March 6, 2019

There is nothing in this “how-to” video that anyone should ever do. Like ever. That hasn’t stopped Xavier De La Rue from pretending that with the proper step-by-step instructions you too can safely bomb icy death chutes in the French Alps just like he does. Seriously, don’t do any of this. But watch it, because it’s always good to see Xavier straight-lining vertical hockey rinks without dying. Isn’t it?

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The End of Print At TransWorld Media

by The Editors on March 5, 2019

In letters to subscribers that began arriving in mailboxes the week of March 3, 2019, American Media Inc, the current owner of TransWorld Skateboarding and Snowboarding magazines announced that both publications will “no longer be published.” Adding insult to insanity, the company also promised to fulfill remaining subscriptions to the legacy titles with copies of their recently acquired (June 2017) magazine Men’s Journal. 

Founded in 1983 by Tracker Trucks owner Larry Balma and Peggy Cozens, Transworld Media built a place where creative kids could flourish mostly undisturbed by outside forces. Aside from helping to usher in the modern board sports era and making skateboarding and snowboarding central to mass youth culture, TransWorld also served as a launch pad for innumerable success stories in fashion, design, photography, music, and filmmaking. Simply put Transworld’s contributions to pop culture cannot be overstated. 

As expected the news lit up social media with eulogies, remembrances, and words of thanks for the part both magazines played in lives of millions. Athletes, artistsmagazine editorsphotographers, designers, legendsTV personalities, brand owners, and even sports agents praised the magazines and lamented the end of what was a really good run.

 

 
 
 
 
 
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@transworldskate 1983-2019 I Helped from Issue #1 back in 1983 and worked there as Photo Editor and Senior Photographer until leaving in 2003. Before computers, internet, phones, podcasts, live-streaming ,etc, Skate Mags and Zines were the only way to see and share what was going on in Skateboarding around the world. We would work on an article or interview for months and skaters would have to wait to get their Skate Fix in the mailbox and then they would pass it on. Readers would study each photo and read every word and soak it in and never forget it. Covers were a big thing, Centerspreads too. Transworld grew organically over time from the tiny black and white amateurish rag into a thick high quality and collectible magazine. The page count varied with the financial ups and downs and popularity of skateboarding, but it always came around, that’s Skateboarding. The digital revolution has taken its toll on all Print, humans just don’t get their news and entertainment from print anymore and they want it Immediately. Hey, time marches on and hopefully future skaters will get creative and produce compelling stories, magazines, books, art, photography and music that need to be felt, held and listened to. Cheers to all of the people that worked on Transworld Skateboarding Magazine and thanks to Larry Balma and Peggy Cozens for taking a chance and starting it. TWS supported a lot of families over the years, we can’t forget that. Sorry to see something with such a Legacy go. This April, 1986 Cover is of @lancemountain in Stockholm, Sweden, Summer, 1985. Photo: Brittain #transworldskateboardingmagazine #transworldskate #larrybalma #peggycozens #skatemagazines #skateboardingmagazine #skatezines #skateboardingisfun #lancemountain #jgrantbrittain

A post shared by Grant Brittain (@jgrantbrittain) on

When we mentioned to a publishing executive that this must be what it feels like to outlive an era, he replied, “I think the era we have outlived is the era of niche media as corporate commodity. Doesn’t seem to work so well.”

And that is true. Independent action media brands like Thrasher Magazine and The Snowboarder’s Journal continue to thrive in print, suggesting that the end of print at TransWorld may have more to do with corporate greed/overhead than anything else. Then again, we have yet to see anyone under the age of 30 lamenting the news, so there’s that as well.

As for the future, TransWorld Skateboarding will live on as a digital property (the staff has already begun posting “thanks, but we’re still here” to their social media streams) and sources tells us that management is working out the details on how and/or which of the company’s two snowboard brands will be preserved online rolling forward.

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Thank you for all the love❤️❤️ While the subscription/newsstand based print mag is no longer, (sorry about that notice letter) TWS is still a brand with a crew here working on digital projects like: A feature length Daewon Song documentary out in May and other quality content on our website, youtube, and other social channels. Special Limited Print editions are being planned. Thank you to everyone that has worked here on the magazine over 36 years for all of your inspiration and dedication to skateboarding. And Thank You to all of our subscribers, readers and audience for the support and love through the years.❤️❤️ Onto the next chapter. -TWS crew

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We’d be more optimistic about Transworld’s digital future if it weren’t for AMI. Their reputation for always doing the wrong thing (along with their reportedly toxic CEO David Pecker) doesn’t bode well for the brands.

Through all the sadness we are cheered by the fact that these magazines lasted 20 years longer than we thought they would when we first began preaching the digital revolution. Good work. And, as this has all happened before (remember Skateboarder Magazine and Action Now?) we’re looking forward to what the next generation of creative kids will assemble out of the wreckage.

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The Sinister Plot Behind The Super-Mega Pass

by The Editors on March 5, 2019

It’s barely March and already the resort industrial complex is inundating us with marketing for their super-mega season passes for the winter of 2019-2020. Really? Already? Why are they doing this and what does it mean all mean? We’re glad you asked.

Before we dive in let’s make one thing clear — obviously if you ride 20 days a year or more at the same few resorts owned by the same corporation then buying a super-mega pass is a no-brainer. Spend the $950 and get on it. If, however, you enjoy controlling your own money, waiting for good snow, and riding different resorts all season long, here are a few things you might want to consider before shelling out hard earned cash on an Epic or Ikon pass.

The corporations that run ski resorts in North America (Alterra Mountain Company and Vail Resorts) have very sound business reasons for selling super-mega season passes and they have nothing to do with giving you a good deal. They’re not interested in saving you a boatload of money. And it’s not because they’re putting their guest’s needs first. It all comes down to three main goals:

  1. They want your money now. Not next year. Now!
  2. They want ALL your money. Resorts don’t want you to spend a dime with their competitors (or competitor as the case may be in North America).
  3. They want to offload all their weather related business risks to you so they won’t have to worry as much when a bad snow year strikes.

Once you understand this, the whole mega-pass gambit makes more sense — for the resorts. Look at the way they promote their mega-pass sales. It’s like they’re setting up a con. First, they manufacture scarcity to increase perceived value: “This special deal is available for a limited time only.” We’ve all see the emails, “You have one more week to lock in savings.” “Hurry, this deal won’t last forever.” Why won’t it last? Good question. It could last all season. There’s nothing stopping the resorts from selling super-mega passes all season long. It wouldn’t even be that bad a deal for them. People who bought passes later in the year would have fewer chances to use them. You’d think resorts would do that. But selling passes later in the season doesn’t get your money a year in advance and lock you into their resort for the entire season, and it certainly doesn’t protect resort owners from the specter of a bad snow year.

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This Is The Guy Running Action Sports Media

by The Editors on March 4, 2019

Lately, we’ve been wondering what it’s been like for that small group of action sports media professionals who survived the AMI takeover of The Enthusiast Network. How is working for Trump pal David Pecker?

So far we’ve heard nothing from inside the building, but The Daily Beast posted a profile on March 2, 2019 titled How David Pecker Built His Tabloid Empire on Fear that might give some insight into how it could be going for those who still remain. The old story, written nearly two decades ago, suggests that Mr. Pecker has morphed his management style very little over the past 20 years.

[Link: The Daily Beast]

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Sweeping Up The Headlines Into A Little Pile

by The Editors on March 1, 2019

News, dog. News. It’s that time of the week when we corral up all the headlines for the stories that got away into one big ol’ list and post them up. Take a look at what’s been going down over the past few weeks, follow the jump.

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If A Tree Falls In The Forest And . . .

by The Editors on February 11, 2019

This is pretty much the only thing we saw from the 33rd Annual Mt. Baker Legendary Banked Slalom and seriously, it scared the scary out of us. Think of all the times these guys have been close to death on the mountain and then this happens at the cabin:

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Woke up to an earthquake on Saturday, we thought. Offline living in the thick forest 😅 #lbs33

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Snowboarder Dies On Bogus Basin Gap

by The Editors on February 11, 2019

Snowboarder Shea Hemlick, 32, of Meridian, Idaho died after being hit by an SUV while trying to jump a Bogus Basin road gap according to a story in the Idaho Statesman.

The accident happened at about 3:15 p.m. near milepost 15 on Bogus Basin Road in Boise County. . . Hemlick was snowboarding outside the boundary of the ski area when he attempted to jump the road, according to ISP. . . The snowboarder collided with a 2006 Hummer H2. . . He wasn’t wearing a helmet, police said.

Road gaps around Bogus Basin (like being cleared by Sean McDonald in the above video) have been popular with snowboarders (and mountain bikers) for years. For the rest of the story, please click the link.

[Link: Idaho Statesman]

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Snowboarder Dies In Snowmass Terrain Park

by The Editors on February 11, 2019

On Sunday, February 10, 2019 a 20-year-old snowboarder died after crashing on the first jump in the Makaha Terrain Park, according to a story on 9News.com.

Patrol crews responded to the area and found a man unresponsive. He was not wearing a helmet, according to Hanle. Despite immediate life-saving efforts, rescuers were unable to re-establish a pulse. . . The man was pronounced dead at the scene by the Pitkin County Coroner.

Snowmass, spokesperson Jeff Hanle said “Our deepest sympathies and thoughts go out to the man’s family and friends, and we are offering support and assistance.”

[Link: 9News.com]

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