Fashion

News From A While Back Today

by The Editors on January 29, 2019

Links? We got ’em. Not much more to say about it than that, right? Follow jump for a whole slew of links.

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Benny Gold’s Peace Out Letter

by The Editors on January 15, 2019

In a farewell letter published on Hypebeast outlining exactly why he is ending the Benny Gold brand and handing his SF retail space back over to HUF, Benny Gold (the person) outlines the situation successful artists often get in when their “brand” becomes bigger than themselves — better in one paragraph than many have been able to do in 30 page Keynote projects. He explains exactly how it feels when the beastly machine begins driving the master and creating its own reality. Here is the paragraph from Hypebeast.

We have a beautiful flagship location in San Francisco and an outstanding staff that has helped me realize my full potential. The brand has become bigger than myself and I am forever grateful for this. . . But with this success comes it’s own set of challenges. I now find myself growing less creatively as my days are spent managing people, budgets, and production issues. I am feeling increasing pressure to follow trends and go more “urban” in the attempt to capture more market share. A brand becomes a living, breathing thing and every brand has a life cycle -— well it’s become increasingly clear to me that the Benny Gold brand is nearing its end. I would rather bring it to a close and celebrate it’s life with integrity rather than push it to become something I no longer believe in.

How’s that? It answers so many questions we’ve had about other emerging clothing brands. How do you keep doing the same thing over and over? Season in, season out? It’s nice to see someone admit it straight up — you can’t. Not unless you change everything that got you there in the first place.

Congrats Benny. Well done. We look forward to seeing what you’re working on in the next phase.

[Link: Hypebeast]

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Supreme’s $1 Milllion Skateboard Auction

by The Editors on January 15, 2019

We’ve always felt a strange disconnect between East Coast “streetwear” and skateboarding in general. Nothing brings our confusion into clearer focus than Supreme. Yes, James Jebbia has done a stellar job of appropriating all the right stuff to create a billion dollar clothing company, starting with artwork from Barbara Kruger and then logoing pretty much everything and marketing it to NYC’s label obsessed kids. But, really? Is a collection of 248 “limited edition” Supreme skate decks really worth $1 million dollars? Guess we’ll find out soon enough, at Sotheby’s, according to a story on The National

The 248 boards, which will be sold as one lot through Sotheby’s, offer a unique archive of Supreme’s work and present a rare opportunity to see all of the designs together. Not surprisingly, this adds to the value and, with no buyer’s premium, the collection is expected to sell on January 25 for between US$800,000 and $1.2million (up to Dh4.4m).

Go get ’em Ryan Fuller. What are the chances the new owner will be an EDM producer? Pretty high we’d guess.

[Link: The National]

 

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Vans Suing Primark Over Old Schools

by The Editors on January 4, 2019

What makes a copyrightable stripe? Looks like Vans and Primark are going to find out as the footwear giant sues Primark over what it considers “identical knockoffs” according to story on Cosmopolitan.com.

A lawsuit alleging trademark infringement, unfair competition and false advertising was filed in New York last month. . . The two designs in dispute are the Vans Old Skool sneaker, featuring the iconic side stripe, and the Vans Sk8-Hi sneaker, a lace-up high top also with the classic stripe. The court documents state that Primark’s use of a side stripe on its trainers is confusing to the consumer. . . “The Side Stripe Trademark’s prominent placement and often-contrasted colour make Vans’ shoes immediately recognisable to consumers even at far-off distances,” say the documents.

When you compare this to all the skate brands that have boosted Vans designs over the years, it looks pretty mudane, but they have to protect their IP.

[Link: Cosmopolitan]

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Jake Drops Mine 77 Collection

by The Editors on December 13, 2018

We’d like to think that Burton itself is the product of Jake Carpenter’s “creativity,” but it seems that corporations outgrown their founders by design. It’s nice to see Jake getting back to doing the stuff he likes to do with the Mine 77 collection . . . even if it is made up of $700 jackets, $400 backpacks, and $60 tee shirts. 

[Link: Burton Snowboards]

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Jack English Launches Sea Of Seven

by The Editors on December 12, 2018

Surf photog Jack English has launched a new “style brand” with his 10-year-old daughter Eden. It’s called Sea of Seven. It goes a little like this:

Driven by unstoppable rhythms, Sea Of Seven is a divergent clash of art, sound and style. Inspired by authentic ocean living and creative surf lifestyles, Sea Of Seven designs custom posters, prints, apparel, décor and accessories featuring Jack English’s original surf photography.

For the official word from Sea of Seven, please follow the jump.

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Burton Recycles The Bright 90s

by The Editors on December 6, 2018

We’re not that interested in doing 1992 over again, but if you missed the first go-round then boy does Burton have something for you in their 92 Retro Collection. The capsule features Jason Ford-a-licious block color jackets, classic asym air 45 logo graphics on a Family Tree Speed Date, Trick Pilot, and Stun Gun boards and much, much more.

Honor the past while experiencing the latest performance with this modern, more technical take on an iconic era.

Iconic, indeed, but reminds us of something the band Jamie Wednesday once said, “Pop will eat itself.”

[Link: Burton Snowboards]

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Dakine Sold To Marquee Brands

by The Editors on December 6, 2018

Marquee Brands, LLC, owners of zombie brands like Body Glove, Ben Sherman, and Bruno Magli, announced yesterday (December 5, 2018) that they have acquired the Dakine brand along with all related intellectual property. They’ve also partnered with JR286 to operate the brand.

Marquee Brands and JR286, who will develop Dakine’s core categories, will maintain dedicated teams for the brand in Hood River, Los Angeles, California, and Annecy, France. Ken Meidell, Dakine’s current CEO, will be joining the Marquee Brands team.

Last we checked Dakine was owned by Altamont Capital, which also holds majority positions in Brixton, Fox Head, and Mervin Manufacturing. They paid $70 million for Dakine when they bought it from Billabong in 2013, wonder what this sale means for the rest of the portfolio. Maybe nothing, maybe something. For the official word from Marquee, please follow the jump.

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Gigi Rüf Joins 686 Technical Apparel

by The Editors on December 6, 2018

686 is proud to announce the addition of iconic snowboarder Gigi Rüf to the team.

Gigi brings his own unique approach to snowboarding and will complement the entire global 686 team including snowboarders Forest Bailey, Sammy Luebke, Phil Jacques, Victor Daviet, Matt Belzile and Mary Rand. . . and more.

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Zero + Roark + Motor Collab

by The Editors on November 30, 2018

Psych. We were just going to mention a new super limited collar between Zero, Roark Revival, and Argentinian artist Motor when we realized that it’s already sold out. Nope, you’re not getting one of the 50 boards signed by Jamie Thomas.

If you’re in Berkeley, California, however, and you love shopping with a buzz to loosen your wallet, then you’re in luck because Roark Revival’s new retail/bar the Explorer’s Club is open and ready for your next beered up holiday shopping spree. Click the link for all the details.

[Link: Roark Revival]

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